Social Research

Levi Strauss not to be forgotten that success is not a coincidence but the reward for those who fight for him, for whom falling knew how to stand up, to whom he felt only sought company, for whom before seeking to be understood could understand. Every beginning has an end, for some a short-lived, for others long such as Levi Strauss who left this physical world before his 101 birthday. As Wikipedia reminds us, Claude Levi-Strauss was born in Brussels on 28 November 1908, son of French Jewish parents of Alsatian origin. He studied in Paris, in the lycees Janson de Sailly and Condorcet. He studied law and philosophy at the Sorbonne. Not he continued his studies of law, only those in philosophy in 1931. After working a few years of teaching in secondary education, he accepted a last-minute offer to be part of the French cultural mission to Brazil, country that would serve as a visiting professor at the University of Sao Paulo.

Disenchanted of speculative philosophy and theoretical, it approached the Ethnology and he was sent on a mission to Brazil in 1935, where he worked as Professor at the Universidad de San Pablo and directed several ethnographic expeditions to the Mato Grosso and the Amazon, among the bororo and the nambikwara Indians who star in most of their subsequent analysis. He lived in Brazil from 1935 to 1939, and there carried out his first ethnographic field work, managing periodic scans in the Mato Grosso and the Amazon rainforest. This was the experience that cemented his identity as a professional of anthropology. He returned to France on the eve of the second world war and was mobilized from 1939 to 1940 at the outbreak of this. After the Armistice, moved to United States, where he taught at the New School for Social Research in New York. In this city he met and treated the linguist Roman Jakobson, whose work was fundamental to the evolution of their ideas.