Mintzberg Information

Address is the activation, direction and maintenance of human effort to comply with the plans. Includes motivating people to carry out its work, the establishment of leadership as a guide, the coordination of individual efforts towards achieving common objectives and dealing with conflicts. 4.4. Control The control function aims to ensure that the results obtained at one point in conformity with the requirements of the plans. Includes monitoring of activities, comparing results with goals, correct deviations and feedback to redefine objectives or strategies, if necessary.

Management roles inspired by Fayol’s approach indicates a poor guide to what managers actually do. He suggested that the manager plans reflective and systematic manner, that a manager does not address efficient routine activities, their decisions are based on a formal information system that usually operates on methods, techniques and scientific procedures. Henry Mintzberg, in the late 60s, tried to show that this view was not very certain or very useful. This researcher became clear that managers are working without respite, short activities, discontinuously, action-oriented and a bit reflective. It also undertakes routine activities, seek information through non-formal and very often appeal to their good sense or intuition in making decisions. For Mintzberg, a manager at any level has a formal authority. Therefore occupies a social position or status from which it must interact with others. In such relationships arises a flow of information that allows decision-making in the organization or the unit he leads. Thus, Mintzberg (1986, pp. 1955-1967), established ten roles played by every manager every day.